HOW TO MOUNT THE MIDLAND

XTC 200 ON THE GOGGLE  

 

Since 2008 I have been filming my catches with the subjective technique by mounting the camera on the speargun. Although it might be amazing, this way of filming is in my opinion too static and does not allow to record all the phases of the dive, losing as result the possibility to frame the prey from the first sight to the moment of the shoot. It’s quite straightforward that if you want to avoid this, you should wave your speargun in an unfruitful way to catch fishes.

 

I have recently changed my camera (with under water case) with the XTC 200 and I have figured out its submergible case limits, together with the other users, when it is mounted on the speargun barrel. Although the latest improvements made by the producer, I still hear about broken and lost cases as a consequence of the recoil. However, this action cam can solve both the filming limit matter and the recoil problem thanks to its very small size allowing it to be mounted on the goggle!

 

Even in this case some modifications must be made because, let’s be frank, this product was not designed for spearfishing so it needs adaptation. It is equipped with several mounts but we need just one: the ski goggle mount. This modification is very easy to perform and should be done because an underwater goggle strap is thicker than a ski goggle one. The thicker strap, in fact, by passing under the component A. as shown by arrow 1. does not allow the latter to have grip on the rest of the structure and as a consequence it gets detached. In order to solve such a problem you just need to sew a ring made with a tailor band (about 2cm wide) around both the component A. and the rest of the structure. After that I screwed the component B. on top of that in order to avoid it to slide away in the water. To be even safer I have linked the security lace to the case and the mount as shown in the picture below. Another thing to bear in mind is the angle of the component B. Because of the normal shape of the human head, when we wear a goggle, the strap gets an angle of about 45° compared to the eyes axe, as shown in the mannequin picture. For this reason you should rotate clockwise the component B. in order to give it the same angle as the eyes one.

 

 

Someone might say that by choosing this option the filming might result too “dynamic” with a seasickness effect: false! A good spearo knows that he should slowly rotate even his head while fishing! By placing the Midland on the goggle you have an extra advantage represented by a wider view and the case integrity doesn’t run any risk, check it out yourself.

 

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